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Vexventures

                  
 
crux 123

Current Issue of Crux Australis: Issue No. 123

The most recent issue of Crux Australis is No. 123 [Volume 30/3] issued for the period July - September 2017.

The contents are:

Vexillogistics (editorial)   Tony Burton

page 10=5

Designer of PNG flag  

obituary, Radio NZ

page 106
Papua New Guinea crest and flag   Geoff Littler pages 107 - 110
Fiji - the flag , the medal, the fall-out   Sydney Morning Herald page 111
Canada's Bright 150th  

Ralph GC Bartlett

pages 112 - 115
Logo Controversies  

Canadian press

pages 116 - 120
Flag flubs  

Daily Mail and other media

pages 121 - 122

Flags for the ANZACs   Know your flag quiz page 123
"Blood of martyrs": Mauritania flag change?   Agence France Press pages 124 - 125
Retiring flags   Ralph Kelly pages 126 - 134
Top end flag man  

ABC Radio, Darwin

pages 135 - 136
Designer's Corner:      
Vexadventures - part II   Davod Maus and Rachel Brandon pages 137 - 145
Two shades of blue: Argentina - vexing vex   The Americas page 146
Tanzania takes two to tango  

Tony Burton

page 147

Springfield, Missouri  

Radio KY3, Springfield

page 148

Rochester city flag  

www.rochesterflag.com

pages 149 - 151

Big K for Kaiapoi   Tony Burton & John Moody pages 152 - 156
Gilbert Baker: rainbow designer   obituary, NY Times pages 157 - 158

SUMMARY

Framing the edition, tributes mark the recent passing of two flag designers, each influential in different ways. Susan Karike Huhume is honoured for her design chosen in 1971 as the flag of Papua New Guinea, Australia’s nearest neighbour. Gilbert Baker’s version of the Rainbow Flag has galvanised LGBT people, men and women, all over the world.

In recognition of a different kind, the Fijian Government has issued a special banknote in the colours of the national flag to mark the first ever Olympic gold medal won by Fijian athletes at Rio de Janeiro. In 2017, Canada celebrates 150 years since its foundation in July 1867 as a confederation.

Though the British Empire of which Canada was a major part has been transformed, its chief and distinctive symbol, the Union Jack, remains the most distinguished among flags, containing within its folds a design elegance to test those who think they know flags, even their own. In this way, the Saudi and the Australian flags are not immune in the hoisting, even in London, while the detail of the starry one prompts the quiz about its twin across the Tasman.

Others still want to fiddle with their flags – the latest (and failed essay of a political faction) the flag of Mauritania.

Designers’ Corner again takes up the ambiguity of blue in both heraldry and flagcraft - in the flags of Argentina and Tanzania. The inspiration of TED talks on flags is reason for redesigning civic flags in New Zealand, with Rochester, Columbia, Springfield just a few of over 60 in the US alone.

Vexillologists are people who do, or should know, their flags. The Top End Flag Man interviewed is one of them. An eclectic selection of “favourite” flags demonstrates however that there are some who seem content with the superficial and subjective. Others again take the national flag seriously enough to seek formal obsequies for flags worn beyond practical use: Flags Australia’s submission on the matter recommends against such liturgies: overblown reverence too easily turns to propaganda.

 

 

Commentary by Tony Burton

 

For previous issues see: Crux Index vol 26 - current
  Crux Index vol 21-25
  Crux Index vol 16-20
  Crux Index vol 11-15
  Crux Index vol 6-10
  Crux Index vol 1-5

 

ICV13 Report

 

ICV13 Report

 

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