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Vexventures

                  
 

Current Issue of Crux Australis: Issue No. 133

The most recent issue of Crux Australis is No. 133 [Volume 33/1] issued for the period January - March 2020.

The contents are:

Vexillogistics (editorial)   Tony Burton

page 3

The Australian flag: high time for a rethink?   LENS, Monash University pages 4 - 6
Identity and the indigenous issue  

LENS, Monash University

page 7

Aboriginal Arts and Culture Gallery  

Tony Burton

pages 7 - 9

Aboriginal flag row

 

Lorena Allam, The Guardian,media release by Minister Ken Wyatt and Tony Burton

pages 9 - 10

Under the southern stars  

Tony Burton and Michael Iacuone

pages 11 - 13
The golden wattle flag  

Tony Burton and Jeremy Matthews

pages14 - 20

Bougainville: an aspiring nation   Ralph Kelly pages 21 - 27
Flags of the sun   Quiz pages 28 - 29
Australian ensigns red handed down from history  

Tony Burton

pages 30 - 42

From one red ensign to another (Hong Kong)  

Tony Burton

pages 43 - 44

Hong Kong's flag was designed to be a symbol of unity   Oscar Holland, CNN pages 45 - 49
Legendary Darwin flag man   Gabrielle Lyons, ABC Radio Darwin pages 50 - 52

SUMMARY

The annual anniversary of the foundation of European settlement in Australia invites the opening flag articles, with seasonal and predictable calls for a new flag. Some look in new ways to the stars familiar from the present and previous flags. Daylight reveals an alternative but equally simple design inspired by the national floral emblem, arranged in a seven-seat circle to form the Commonwealth Star, the second main feature of the current flag - a Bora ring for when this country truly comes of age.

A chance discovery in a small bush town of versions of an Edwardian-era ensign sheds light on its long use as the de facto national flag of Australia; a red ensign used by the people before they were permitted to use the blue version that is now the national flag for all to use. 

Difficult circumstances and their disappointments create their own symbols.  Bougainvilleans’ near-unanimous vote for independence was accompanied by displays of a flag that has been used since 1975 in the long struggle to achieve sovereignty. Eight successive months of unrest and vexilloids of the folding type in Hong Kong signal in different ways that sovereignty resides with the people, however politicians manipulate otherwise.

Confronting as it ever was, the Aboriginal flag retains its power as the flag of a cause too long buried in the basement of Australian history: short articles relate to its latest controversy and preservation of part of the 1971 original.  Harold Thomas’ design is one among 32 that also turn to a solar symbol for inspiration, recognition challenged via the related quiz.

Having last word, Darwin’s veteran Flagman is witness that the fascination of flags can be a life-time and personal passion beyond the political.

 

 

Commentary by Tony Burton

 

For previous issues see: Crux Index vol 31 - current
  Crux Index vol 26 - 30
  Crux Index vol 21-25
  Crux Index vol 16-20
  Crux Index vol 11-15
  Crux Index vol 6-10
  Crux Index vol 1-5

 

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Material Copyright to the Flag Society of Australia Inc and Pennant Advisory Services Pty Limited. Text and illustrations by Ralph Kelly. Web Design by Elizabeth Kelly of ELK Prints.